Reporting liquidating distributions

Posted by / 24-Aug-2020 07:41

Reporting liquidating distributions

If the debtor's income is less than 150% of the poverty level (as defined in the Bankruptcy Code), and the debtor is unable to pay the chapter 7 fees even in installments, the court may waive the requirement that the fees be paid. The Bankruptcy Code allows an individual debtor (4) to protect some property from the claims of creditors because it is exempt under federal bankruptcy law or under the laws of the debtor's home state. The debtor should consult an attorney to determine the exemptions available in the state where the debtor lives. The bankruptcy clerk gives notice of the bankruptcy case to all creditors whose names and addresses are provided by the debtor. trustee or bankruptcy administrator (5) schedules the meeting at a place that does not have regular U. trustee or bankruptcy administrator staffing, the meeting may be held no more than 60 days after the order for relief. Among the schedules that an individual debtor will file is a schedule of "exempt" property. Thus, whether certain property is exempt and may be kept by the debtor is often a question of state law. As long as the stay is in effect, creditors generally may not initiate or continue lawsuits, wage garnishments, or even telephone calls demanding payments. In addition, if the debtor is a business, the bankruptcy court may authorize the trustee to operate the business for a limited period of time, if such operation will benefit creditors and enhance the liquidation of the estate. Accordingly, the debtor is not particularly interested in the trustee's disposition of the estate assets, except with respect to the payment of those debts which for some reason are not dischargeable in the bankruptcy case. The debtor must sign a written reaffirmation agreement and file it with the court. The attorney must also certify that the debtor was fully informed and voluntarily made the agreement and that reaffirmation of the debt will not create an undue hardship for the debtor or the debtor's dependants. Thus, the debtor will not be permitted to convert the case repeatedly from one chapter to another. The trustee may also attempt to recover money or property under the trustee's "avoiding powers." The trustee's avoiding powers include the power to: set aside preferential transfers made to creditors within 90 days before the petition; undo security interests and other prepetition transfers of property that were not properly perfected under nonbankruptcy law at the time of the petition; and pursue nonbankruptcy claims such as fraudulent conveyance and bulk transfer remedies available under state law. The debtor is only paid if all other classes of claims have been paid in full. If the debtor decides to reaffirm a debt, he or she must do so before the discharge is entered. If the debtor was represented by an attorney in connection with the reaffirmation agreement, the attorney must certify in writing that he or she advised the debtor of the legal effect and consequences of the agreement, including a default under the agreement. Such debtors should consider filing a petition under chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. There are exceptions in emergency situations or where the U. trustee (or bankruptcy administrator) has determined that there are insufficient approved agencies to provide the required counseling. Although an individual chapter 7 case usually results in a discharge of debts, the right to a discharge is not absolute, and some types of debts are not discharged.

But if the case appears to be an "asset" case at the outset, unsecured creditors (7) must file their claims with the court within 90 days after the first date set for the meeting of creditors. The primary role of a chapter 7 trustee in an asset case is to liquidate the debtor's nonexempt assets in a manner that maximizes the return to the debtor's unsecured creditors. Section 726 of the Bankruptcy Code governs the distribution of the property of the estate. A reaffirmation is an agreement between the debtor and the creditor that the debtor will remain liable and will pay all or a portion of the money owed, even though the debt would otherwise be discharged in the bankruptcy. The Bankruptcy Code requires that reaffirmation agreements contain an extensive set of disclosures described in 11 U. If the balance is not enough to pay the debt to be reaffirmed, there is a presumption of undue hardship, and the court may decide not to approve the reaffirmation agreement. The Bankruptcy Code requires a reaffirmation hearing if the debtor has not been represented by an attorney during the negotiating of the agreement, or if the court disapproves the reaffirmation agreement.

In a situation where only one spouse files, the income and expenses of the non-filing spouse are required so that the court, the trustee and creditors can evaluate the household's financial position. In other jurisdictions, the individual debtor has the option of choosing between a federal package of exemptions or the exemptions available under state law. But filing the petition does not stay certain types of actions listed under 11 U. The stay arises by operation of law and requires no judicial action.

In order to complete the Official Bankruptcy Forms that make up the petition, statement of financial affairs, and schedules, the debtor must provide the following information: Married individuals must gather this information for their spouse regardless of whether they are filing a joint petition, separate individual petitions, or even if only one spouse is filing. Many states have taken advantage of a provision in the Bankruptcy Code that permits each state to adopt its own exemption law in place of the federal exemptions. § 362(b), and the stay may be effective only for a short time in some situations. The debtor must attend the meeting and answer questions regarding the debtor's financial affairs and property.

If a husband and wife have filed a joint petition, they both must attend the creditors' meeting and answer questions. In order to preserve their independent judgment, bankruptcy judges are prohibited from attending the meeting of creditors. Generally, excluding cases that are dismissed or converted, individual debtors receive a discharge in more than 99 percent of chapter 7 cases.

trustee will report to the court whether the case should be presumed to be an abuse under the means test described in 11 U. Some trustees provide written information on these topics at or before the meeting to ensure that the debtor is aware of this information. Because a chapter 7 discharge is subject to many exceptions, debtors should consult competent legal counsel before filing to discuss the scope of the discharge.

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The Bankruptcy Code requires the trustee to ask the debtor questions at the meeting of creditors to ensure that the debtor is aware of the potential consequences of seeking a discharge in bankruptcy such as the effect on credit history, the ability to file a petition under a different chapter, the effect of receiving a discharge, and the effect of reaffirming a debt. However, a condition of the debtor's voluntary conversion is that the case has not previously been converted to chapter 7 from another chapter. A discharge releases individual debtors from personal liability for most debts and prevents the creditors owed those debts from taking any collection actions against the debtor. Among other reasons, the court may deny the debtor a discharge if it finds that the debtor: failed to keep or produce adequate books or financial records; failed to explain satisfactorily any loss of assets; committed a bankruptcy crime such as perjury; failed to obey a lawful order of the bankruptcy court; fraudulently transferred, concealed, or destroyed property that would have become property of the estate; or failed to complete an approved instructional course concerning financial management.

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